Military thread

Mar 11, 2007
495
28
Floreat, Western Australia
tanks need to be able to be remotely controlled. like the F35, but you can"t tell any one, its a secret :sweat:
It's not really a tank - more of a fire support vehicle for troops, though it can work as a TD if needed. The weird look comes from placing the crew in a cocoon deep inside the vehicle and having the turret automated + the use of plastic based armour.

The width of the tracks is a dead giveaway that this is not a tank, per-se, but an up-armoured AFV.
 
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Feb 6, 2009
1,457
48
New Zealand
One Of My Uncles Just Got Proof That My Great Grandad 'George Jenkins' Was In The '3rd Cavalry Brigade' One Of The First Artillery Gun Crews To Fire A Shell At The Germans In WWI.

He Saved The Empty Casing And Carried It Throughout The War And Apparently It Is Now In The British Imperial War Museum.

It Was Always Known Throughout The Family Cause We Had A News Article But We Needed The Proof, Havn't Yet been Told What The Proof Is Just That Its Finally Getting Officially Recognized.

Though It Was Interesting, I Like Finding Out About Family Ties And Things.
 
Sep 13, 2013
233
18
23
Moss Vale, NSW
One Of My Uncles Just Got Proof That My Great Grandad 'George Jenkins' Was In The '3rd Cavalry Brigade' One Of The First Artillery Gun Crews To Fire A Shell At The Germans In WWI.

He Saved The Empty Casing And Carried It Throughout The War And Apparently It Is Now In The British Imperial War Museum.

It Was Always Known Throughout The Family Cause We Had A News Article But We Needed The Proof, Havn't Yet been Told What The Proof Is Just That Its Finally Getting Officially Recognized.

Though It Was Interesting, I Like Finding Out About Family Ties And Things.
My great-great-uncle; a Seargent with the 3rd Brigade, 1st AIF, fought at the Gallipoli Peninsula during April-May 1915. He was one of the first ones off the boats as they landed at ANZAC cove, but unfortunately was KIA about a week into the campaign.
 
Sep 6, 2007
4,281
83
Collinsville
tinyurl.com
Tanks were initially called “landships.” However, in an attempt to disguise them as water storage tanks rather than as weapons, the British decided to code name them “tanks"

http://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/75-interesting-facts-about-ww1.html



Following a massive naval bombardment, 35,000 US and Canadian troops stormed ashore at Kiska. 21 troops were killed in the fire-fight. It would have been worse if there had been Japanese on the island.

http://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/interesting-ww2-facts-including-one-about-killing-farts.html


It was a common practice on fighter planes to load every 5th found with a tracer round to aid in aiming. That was a mistake. The tracers had different ballistics so (at long range) if your tracers were hitting the target, 80% of your rounds were missing. Worse yet, the tracers instantly told your enemy he was under fire and from which direction. Worst of all was the practice of loading a string of tracers at the end of the belt to tell you that you were out of ammo. That was definitely not something you wanted to tell the enemy. Units that stopped using tracers saw their success rate nearly double and their loss rate go down.
 
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Mar 11, 2007
495
28
Floreat, Western Australia
Following a massive naval bombardment, 35,000 US and Canadian troops stormed ashore at Kiska. 21 troops were killed in the fire-fight. It would have been worse if there had been Japanese on the island.
Not 21...all up over 294 Americans and Canadians were killed with the majority of those MIA (nearly 200). How the frack do you lose 200 men on an island teh size of Rottnest with no enemies around?

Ironically, the only Japanese killed were those Marines waiting for extraction from Little Kiska and (wait for it..) they were mistakenly shelled by the Japanese sent to extract them.

Armed Americans are not your friend is the lesson here folks...
 
Sep 6, 2007
4,281
83
Collinsville
tinyurl.com
Not 21...all up over 294 Americans and Canadians were killed with the majority of those MIA (nearly 200). How the frack do you lose 200 men on an island teh size of Rottnest with no enemies around?

Ironically, the only Japanese killed were those Marines waiting for extraction from Little Kiska and (wait for it..) they were mistakenly shelled by the Japanese sent to extract them.

Armed Americans are not your friend is the lesson here folks...
thats for sure :(

Battle of Long Tan Doco

man the radio in this is chilling

http://vimeo.com/19009128


plus this other just cause I never seen it before

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6E2-OOQo13c"]Action In Vietnam - YouTube[/ame]
 
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Apr 1, 2007
63
8
52
Some may find this amusing...

Original article: http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/columnists/karl-du-fresne/9747511/Election-circus-already-under-way

'One of the least surprising pieces of news in the past 100 years or so is the revelation that women in the armed forces are given a hard time.

Allowing women to join the military may have been considered a glorious milestone in the march to sexual equality, but it was bound to end in tears.

The armed services have been male institutions for centuries. They attract men who enjoy the company of other men.

Expecting them to shed their strange tribal traditions and open their arms to women was a worthy but naive ideal. Bullying and sexual harassment, as reported last week, were almost inevitable. Personally, I don't understand why any sensible woman would want to join the military in the first place. It makes as much sense as a rabbi applying to join al Qaeda.'

And the response:

http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/letters-to-the-editor/9756061/Letter-Women-in-the-army-serve-with-pride

'...I offer an open invitation to Mr du Fresne to spend a day with some of our talented military women to find out first-hand the contribution they make. They have assured me they will go slow for him, so that he can keep up.

LT GEN TIM KEATING

Chief of New Zealand Defence Force.

Bravo Zulu CDF......
 
Mar 30, 2008
4,746
63
25
Whitsundays
xavoau.tumblr.com
Just got buzzed by a Tiger ARH. Really fast the first time, just out over the bay from our place and below the hill level.

Then it came back and did some circle work over the bay, before disappearing up along the valley still below hill level - impressive stuff.
Gave me a couple of chills when it lined up and headed straight for the house a bit, kinda like some of those BF2 moments when you're (stupidly) shooting at the cobra with a rifle and it finally notices you :eek:
 

Sgt-JoeKickAss

Donator
Mar 5, 2011
1,452
83
23
Brisbane
www.youtube.com
Just got buzzed by a Tiger ARH. Really fast the first time, just out over the bay from our place and below the hill level.

Then it came back and did some circle work over the bay, before disappearing up along the valley still below hill level - impressive stuff.
Gave me a couple of chills when it lined up and headed straight for the house a bit, kinda like some of those BF2 moments when you're (stupidly) shooting at the cobra with a rifle and it finally notices you :eek:
I remember one time two blackhawks hovered over the building I was in. Kicked the fast ropes out and everything, practice for counter terrorist ops I assume. Badass none the less
 
Sep 6, 2007
4,281
83
Collinsville
tinyurl.com
best thing I have ever watched on Gallipoli
Gallipoli 2005 [Part One]
English Version of Gelibolu 2005 / Tolga Örnek
Gallipoli - The Front Line Experience

The Gallipoli Campaign, also known as the Dardanelles Campaign, the Battle of Gallipoli or the Battle of Çanakkale (Turkish: Çanakkale Savaşı), took place on the Gallipoli peninsula (Gelibolu in modern Turkey) in the Ottoman Empire between 25 April 1915 and 9 January 1916, during World War I. Aiming to secure a sea route to Russia, the British and French launched a naval campaign to force a passage through the Dardanelles. After the naval operation, an amphibious landing was undertaken on the Gallipoli peninsula, to capture the Ottoman capital of Constantinople (Istanbul). After eight months, the land campaign also failed with many casualties on both sides, and the invasion force was withdrawn to Egypt.

The campaign was one of the greatest Ottoman victories during the war and is considered a major failure of the Allies. In Turkey, it is regarded as a defining moment in the nation's history—a final surge in the defence of the motherland as the Ottoman Empire crumbled. The struggle formed the basis for the Turkish War of Independence and the founding of the Republic of Turkey eight years later under Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, a commander at Gallipoli. The campaign is often considered to mark the birth of national consciousness in Australia and New Zealand and the date of the landing, 25 April, is known as "Anzac Day". It remains the most significant commemoration of military casualties and veterans there, surpassing Remembrance Day (Armistice Day)......................
View: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x198iea_gallipoli-2005-part-one_shortfilms

View: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x198aoz_gallipoli-2005-part-two_shortfilms
 
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